WordPress Tutorial – How to Download, Install and Activate a New WordPress Theme

This Intermediate-level WordPress tutorial shows how to change your theme in a blog/website hosted on wordpress.com. It also shows how to find new themes using sites like themes.wordpress.net and install them on a blog/website that uses third-party hosting. By third-party hosting I mean a web host that you pay for, like GoDaddy.com or Yahoo! or pair Networks hosting. Once you find a theme you like, you can download it, unzip the file, upload the theme to the wp-content > themes folder for your blog/website, and then activate it in the Dashboard.

WordPress Tutorial – How to Make Changes to a WordPress Theme Sidebar Using a Text Editor

This Advanced-level WordPress tutorial shows you how to edit the sidebar.php file that is part of a WordPress theme. This is an Advanced tutorial because you will use a text editor to work with the actual PHP file — and FTP software to download and upload the file to a web hosting server — rather than making edits using the WordPress Dashboard.

This tutorial assumes you know how to use a text editor on a Macintosh or on a Windows PC, and it assumes you have and know how to use FTP software to transfer files from a web server to your computer and back up to the server when finished editing. The standard text editing software on a Mac is TextEdit. McBuzz also recommends text editing software called BBEdit, because it highlights the different parts of a PHP or HTML file in different colors, making it much easier to read and edit the file. On a PC, standard text editing software is Notepad and WordPad, which come installed with Windows.

WordPress Tutorial – How to Make a “Child” Subpage and Then Link to That Subpage Using the Blogroll

This Beginner-level WordPress tutorial shows how to create a “child” page. A child page is a subpage that has another page as its “parent”. In some WordPress themes, links to child pages appear underneath a link to the parent page in the website navigation links — either in the sidebar or under the main horizontal navigation links. In other WordPress themes, you cannot see any links to child pages.

In either case, you can create a visible link to a child page by making a new link under one of your Blogroll categories. This tutorial also shows how to find the web address (URL) of a WordPress child page when it is not visible anywhere in the website navigation links.

WordPress Tutorial – How to Make Menus of Links Using the Blogroll – PART TWO

This WordPress tutorial by Mark McLaren of McBuzz Communications is the second part of two in which I show how to make menus or lists of links using the Blogroll. The first part showed how to add a new category to the Blogroll and how to add a link under that category.

This tutorial shows how to create a set of links to pages or posts within your website itself, rather than linking to other websites. This is a handy way to create additional navigation on a WordPress website since the space available for links to Pages — like the About Us, Contact Us page, etc. — is sometimes fairly limited.

WordPress Tutorial – How to Make Menus of Links Using the Blogroll

This WordPress tutorial by Mark McLaren of McBuzz Communications will show you how to create menus or lists of links using what WordPress calls the “Blogroll”.

The term “Blogroll” originally meant a collection of links that a blogger would display in the sidebar of her blog. These would be links to the blogs of her friends and compatriots.

Like many other features of WordPress, you can use the Blogroll to do things that work well in a more traditional website. You can create any number of lists by creating new Blogroll categories. And, in the second part of this tutorial, I show you how to make a list of links to pages within your website.

WordPress Tutorial – How to Position an Image and Wrap Text Around an Image Using WordPress

WordPress Tutorial - Tree Image

Note: Wrapping text around an image is much easier in WordPress 2.5 or later. See the post How to Upload and Insert an Image Using WordPress 2.5+.

This tutorial by Mark McLaren of McBuzz Communications is for WordPress 2.3 or earlier. The technique will actually work in any HTML page, whether you’re using WordPress or not. It shows how to use some basic HTML code to  position an image by aligning it to the left (the default) or to the right. It will also show you how to make text wrap around (or “flow” around) the image so that the image does not sit on its own between two paragraphs of text.

In order to show this, I’m going to create a little more text for my example. This week I discovered that it’s not a great idea to use the generic “greeking” text known as “lorem ipsum” because when my tutorial pages are indexed by Google, the description that appears with the listing in search results doesn’t say anything intelligible! It just looks like nonsense.

From now on, I will endeavor to create meaningful text in my tutorials so that when it is indexed by Google or one of the other search engines, people will be able to see what the tutorial is about!

Here is the code you need to wrap text around an image like you see above. Open the Code editing window (click on the “Code” tab next to the “Visual” tab in the Dashboard editing window underneath the Post/Page Title). Find the “img” tag for the image you want to run text around. Insert the code below as shown. Don’t forget to click on Save or Publish.

<img style="border: 0pt none; float:left; padding-right:10px; padding-bottom:10px" src="images/trees.jpg" .../>

_______________________________

WordPress Tutorial - Tree ImageThe continuation of this tutorial will show how to position an image by aligning it to the right, wrapping text around the left side of the image so that the image does not sit on its own.

Although I’m eschewing the use of “greeking” text for the sake of being indexed by Google, I’m also going to have to be careful not to use the same text from the first example above in this second example — because that would definitely look like spam to Google, i.e., putting the same words on a page or series of pages just to boost my keyword count.

Here is the code you need to wrap text around an image like you see in the second example above. Open the Code editing window (click on the “Code” tab next to the “Visual” tab in the Dashboard editing window underneath the Post/Page Title). Find the “img” tag for the image you want to run text around. Insert the code below as shown. Don’t forget to click on Save or Publish.

<img style="border: 0pt none; float:right; padding-left:10px; padding-bottom:10px" src="images/trees.jpg" .../>

There is a quicker way to do some of this by clicking on the image and then clicking on the “Insert/edit image” button in the Visual editing window. But the options there (Alignment, Border, Vertical space and Horizontal space) do not give you as much control as you may want for some layouts. I talk about this in the video tutorial.


You can see in the comments below that a reader has had problems getting this code to stick. Here’s what my Code editing window looks like when I insert the code:

WordPress Code Insertion Problem

WordPress Tutorial – How to Insert Text into a WordPress Post or Page from Microsoft Word or Other Source

WordPress Tutorial by Mark McLaren of McBuzz Communications shows how to insert text into a WordPress Post or Page from a Microsoft Word Document, PDF, Notepad, WordPad or TextEdit Text Document or other text file format. There are a number of ways to bring text into a Post or Page. This tutorial demonstrates that WordPress works differently on a Windows PC than on a Macintosh running OS 10.3 when it comes to pasting into a Post or Page.

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