WordPress Tutorial – How to Upload & Link to a PDF, Microsoft Word doc, or other doc in WordPress 2.7

This beginner-level WordPress tutorial is an update of the existing tutorial on Business Blogging 101 and YouTube called “WordPress Tutorial – How to Upload and Link to a PDF, Microsoft Word Document, Excel, PowerPoint or Other Doc Using WordPress“. That tutorial was done using an earlier version of WordPress. This tutorial uses WordPress 2.7.

This tutorial shows three things:

1) How to upload a PDF, Microsoft Word doc, PowerPoint or other Office-type document using WordPress 2.7

2) How to insert a link to that document into a WordPress post or page. (Visitors to your site can click on the link to download or view the document.), and

3) that there are two things called “Media Library” in the WordPress 2.7 Dashboard, one of which has more information about the files in the Library than the other does. It’s helpful to see how you get to each of these Media Libraries because you can find the URL link for a file in only one of them, which can be confusing!

UPDATE: WordPress 2.8 fixed the problem of the file URL. Before 2.8, the file URL was only visible in the Media Library that you access via the page/post editing interface. But with 2.8, you can find uploaded file URLs in either one of the Media Libraries. Thanks, WordPress crew!

How to Upload & Link to a PDF, Microsoft Word doc, or other doc in WordPress 2.7


In the comments for this post, a reader asks about how to paste text from Microsoft Word into WordPress. (See discussion below for more.) As part of the answer to that question, here is a screen shot of the WordPress HTML editing tab and window.

 

The WordPress HTML editing tab and window.

WordPress Tutorial – How to Make a Static Page Your Home Page & Hide a Double Home Page Link

UPDATE – PLEASE NOTE:
The latest version of WordPress, WordPress 3.0, includes custom navigation menus. They are built into the new default theme, Twenty Eleven. Many themes on WordPress.com support custom menus. If your site is hosted on WordPress.com or you are using a theme that supports the new custom navigation menus, hiding a double Home page link is easy. See the tutorial on WordPress 101 called Building Custom Menus.*

IF YOU HAVE A SELF-HOSTED WORDPRESS SITE WITH AN OLDER THEME:
If you have a “self-hosted” site instead of one hosted on WordPress.com, you may be able to use the Exclude Pages Plugin for WordPress to hide your extra Home page link and any links that appear in your sidebar Pages navigation.

You can’t install plugins on sites hosted by WordPress.com. That’s one of the main drawbacks to hosting with WordPress.com. For those sites, this YouTube video tutorial (below) is still useful.

If you like this tutorial, you may also like: WordPress Tutorial – How to Make a “Child” Page (Subpage) and How to Hide a Link in the Pages Sidebar Widget

This beginner-level WordPress Tutorial shows how to make a “static” WordPress page your Home page (also called a “front page”), and how to hide the second Home page link that sometimes appears in your site navigation when you make that static page into a Home page.

By default, a WordPress website displays the blog page on the home / front page. For example, on the Business Blogging 101 website home page at https://mcbuzz.wordpress.com you see blog posts with the most recent post at the top of the page and earlier posts below that.

WordPress allows you to select a different page as your home page, so that you can display more traditional content like information about yourself or your business. You can also create another page to use as your blog page, with a link to that page in your site navigation. Watch the video tutorial below to see how to do this.

One problem you may run into when you make a static page your home page is that the link to that page now appears in the main site navigation, so that you have two links to the same home page – usually the page called “Home” in the main site navigation. The second part of this tutorial shows how to remove one of those links from your site navigation so that visitors to your site are not confused by the duplicate link.

WordPress Tutorial – How to Make a Static Page Your Home Page & Hide Double Home Page Link

*Note the “Pay What You Wish” pricing on WordPress 101. Business Blogging 101 is not an affiliate of WordPress 101 WordPress tutorials, meaning that I don’t get a kickback for referring people there.

WordPress Tutorial – How to Make a “Child” Page (Subpage) and How to Hide a Link in the Pages Sidebar Widget

UPDATE – PLEASE NOTE:
If you have a “self-hosted” or third-party-hosted site instead of one hosted on WordPress.com, you may be able to use the Exclude Pages Plugin for WordPress to hide Child Page links that show in popup submenus under your main navigation links and any links that appear in your sidebar Pages navigation.

You can’t install WordPress plugins on sites hosted by WordPress.com. That’s one of the main drawbacks to hosting with WordPress.com. For those sites, this tutorial is still useful.

This beginner-level WordPress tutorial shows 1. How to make a “child” page or subpage of another page (a “parent” page) using the WordPress 2.7 editing interface. And 2. How to hide a link in the Pages sidebar widget, in other words, how to keep a link to a page from showing in the Pages sidebar widget by putting the page (post) ID number into the “Exclude” box in the Pages sidebar widget dialog box.

If you like this tutorial, you may also like: WordPress Tutorial – How to Make a Static Page Your Home Page & Hide a Double Home Page Link

Making “child” pages (subpages) is useful because you may not want all your pages to show in the main page navigation of your WordPress theme. In most themes, only “main” pages (pages that don’t have a “parent”) show up in the main page navigation. In some newer WordPress themes, child pages show up in a popup menu that appears when you roll over the main page link. And in some themes, sub-subpages show up in popup menus as well. These are sometimes called “cascading” navigation menus: sub-subpages show up in a popup menu when you roll over a subpage link.

The second part of this tutorial shows how to hide (or “exclude”) a link to a page that would otherwise appear in the links of the Pages sidebar widget. The tricky part of excluding a link is finding the page / post ID number. I show you how to do this.

Excluding a link is useful for a number of reasons. One is that when you make a static page your Home page in WordPress (by telling WordPress to diplay a Page as your Home page instead of displaying your blog posts), some themes will show the link to this static page as a second home page link in your main navigation. By making the Home page a subpage and excluding that link from the Pages sidebar navigation, you can eliminate the double Home page link.

In WordPress 2.7, you select a static page to use as your Home page using the Settings > Reading panel in the Dashboard. When you do this, be sure to create a new page to use as your Blog page. If you do not designate a page to use as your Blog page, your blog posts will no longer be visible.

How to Make a “Child” Page (Subpage) & Hide a Pages Sidebar Widget Link

WordPress Tutorial – Basic Introduction to the New WordPress 2.7 Dashboard

This video tutorial for WordPress is a basic introduction to the new WordPress version 2.7 Dashboard. It’s a beginner-level tutorial that shows you how to use new features of the Dashboard: How to customize the way different parts of the Dashboard are arranged on the page using drag and drop admin modules (boxes of content). How to open and close module windows and menu options – a very cool feature! How to collapse and expand sidebar menus. And how to hide or show individual modules in the Dashboard.

WordPress 2.7 Dashboard – Basic Introduction

Let it Snow on Your WordPress Blog

Thanks to reader hyperpcs for the nice comment on WordPress 2.7 – So Much to Love! and for asking about the falling snow here on Business Blogging 101.

Falling snow on your WordPress blog is easy as long as it’s hosted on WordPress.com.

In the Dashboard, under Appearance, click on Extras and check the box next to “Show falling snow on my blog. (Only until January 4th 2009.)” Don’t forget to click the “Update Extras” button.

If you want falling snow on your non-WordPress website, see details here: Falling Snow on WordPress.com — Happy Holidays From Business Blogging 101 and McBuzz Communications LLC

As I said in my reply, I appreciate the fact that WordPress.com turns off the snow after January 4th, but I’m not sure how they decided on that date. When I lived in Pittsburgh, we used to get snow as late as April. Too bad WordPress.com was not in charge of that!

Best wishes for the holidays!

How to Put Text On Top of An Image in WordPress

A reader asked if it’s possible to put text on top of an image in WordPress. Actually, the reader asked if it is possible to set an image behind text in WordPress, which is another way to put it.

Either way, the answer is yes! You can do it if you use the WordPress HTML editing window and a little bit of HTML and Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) code. You can watch the video tutorial for this below.

Here’s the code for this example. Paste this into your HTML editing window. Replace the image URL in the example with a URL for an image you want to use, and BOOM!

Text on top of image code. Right click to open or save the file.

This HTML and CSS code is basic stuff that works on any web page, not just a WordPress page or post.

You can increase or decrease the height, width and padding values to work with your image. You may need to change the color of the text so it’s readable over the image. This sample text is colored black using the CSS “color:black;” as shown above.

For more about background images and Cascading Style Sheets, see w3schools.com.

This is a Sample Headline

This is sample paragraph text on top of an image. You may need to change the color of the text so it’s readable over the image.

How to Put Text on Top of an Image – or Set an Image Behind Text

WordPress Tutorial –  How to Use a Text Widget to Customize a WordPress Sidebar

Create a custom sidebar with text, an image and a badge

WordPress Text Widget: Create a custom sidebar box like this with text, an image and a badge.

RELATED POSTS:
How to Use the WordPress Gravatar Widget to Create an About Me Box in Your Sidebar

How to Add a Flickr Photo Widget / Badge to WordPress Sidebar

This Intermediate level WordPress tutorial shows how to use a text widget to customize a sidebar in WordPress. The final product of the tutorial can be seen here in the Business Blogging 101 website’s right sidebar. The HTML code used in this example is below.

NOTE: this video tutorial uses version 2.5 of WordPress. The latest version of WordPress is now 2.7.1. The only difference in this case is that in version 2.7.1 Widgets are now located under Appearance > Widgets (using the navigation buttons in the left side of the WordPress Dashboard). Here is a screen shot of the WordPress 2.7 Dashboard highlighting the new Text widget interface. In version 2.5, Widgets are located under Design > Widgets. Everything else is exactly the same. Use the comment form at the bottom of this post to ask a question if you get confused.

Widgets are a useful feature of most new WordPress themes. These themes are called “widget enabled” or “widgetized” themes. They allow you to add custom content to your sidebars with little or no knowledge of HTML or other code.

In an earlier tutorial, I showed how to add Flickr photos to a WordPress sidebar using the Flickr photo widget.

The example I use in this tutorial shows how to create a custom text box with a short biographical note. Part of that text is a link. In PART TWO of this tutorial, I show how to insert an image into the same custom sidebar box, along with a LinkedIn profile “badge”. You can use these Text Widget techniques to put whatever you want into your own WordPress sidebar.

HTML code used in this tutorial example:

<img src=”https://mcbuzz.files.wordpress.com/2008/08/3058dc0.jpg&#8221; /><br />

I’m an <a href=”https://mcbuzz.wordpress.com/about/”>online marketing consultant</a>, specializing in Web 2.0 social media marketing, search engine optimization, pay per click advertising and WordPress websites for business.

<a href=”http://www.linkedin.com/in/mcbuzzmarkmclaren”><img src=”http://www.linkedin.com/img/webpromo/btn_viewmy_120x33.gif&#8221; border=”0″ alt=”View Mark McLaren’s profile on LinkedIn” width=”120″ height=”33″ /></a>


How to Use a Text Widget to Customize a WordPress Sidebar (Part 1)


How to Use a Text Widget to Customize a WordPress Sidebar (Part 2)

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